Framework in Action

Leadership @ UW supports a growing community of leadership practitioners, including students, faculty and staff, who are applying the UW-Madison Leadership Framework in a wide variety of contexts.

Student Resources

As a student leader, our Leadership Framework and leadership theories can help inform how you continue defining your leadership style, work with others, and make an impact in your communities. Below is a list of leadership theory resources and its use to help transform your leadership experiences. There are also listed examples of leadership programs on campus so you can get involved and to help you think about how to transform your organizations.

  • Leadershare: Our online directory of leadership development programs across campus and how they connect with our Leadership Framework.
  • Programs: A small list of impactful programs that are intimately using the Leadership Framework.
  • Using Leadership Theory: A toolkit of resources that created the Leadership Framework and how they might be helpful for you.

Faculty & Staff Resources

As someone involved in leadership development, whether by title or responsibilities, our Leadership Framework and leadership theories can help you effectively think about how to affect student leadership development, engage your employees in their professional development, or transform your unit.

We have listed leadership theory resources and its use to help transform your leadership development experiences. These resources are helpful in training and workshop design, curriculum design, and program creation. We have listed examples of ways you can learn more about leadership development as well as how other partners in our community have effectively implemented our Leadership Framework.

  • Examples: A small list of impactful programs that are intimately using the Leadership Framework.
  • Leadershare: Our online directory of leadership development programs across campus and how they connect with our Leadership Framework.
  • Programs: A small list of programs to engage in your own leadership development.
  • Using Leadership Theory: A toolkit of resources that created the Leadership Framework and how they might be helpful for you.

Using Leadership Theory - Students

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Authentic Leadership

Elements of positive psychological capacities and positive organizational context lead to positive self-development and trigger events/challenges, finally resulting in authentic leadership.
An Authentic Leadership Development Model (Luthans & Avolio, 2003, p. 251)

What is this?

This theory describes ways to be yourself as a leader so others know about your true intentions and how genuine you are as a person. By using this theory, you could reflect on your values and intentions and see how to build relationships with your peers.

How does it help me?

  • By reflecting on yourself and your own behaviors, you can act more like your true self.
  • Acting authentically overall helps build your own leadership development.
  • By understanding yourself, you can learn how to build shared goals with other people.

How do I use it?

  • Engage in self-reflection like keeping a journal and thinking about what you are passionate about.
  • Join a student organization that can help you self-reflect, like the ones listed below for students.
  • If you are a student leader, help your organization members engage in reflection through ice-breaker activities and getting feedback.

Resource Link

Avolio, B. J., & Gardner, W. L. (2005). Authentic leadership development: Getting to the root of positive forms of leadership. The Leadership Quarterly16(3), 315-338. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.leaqua.2005.03.001 

Collaborative Leadership

Fig. 1 Creating a collaboration culture.

What is this?

Instead of leading alone, through this model, you can learn about how to work with your peers and valuing their skills in groups. By using this theory, you can develop key leadership behaviors in order to work effectively with others and build strong relationships.

How does it help me?

  • By relying on collaborative behaviors rather than your title or position, your peers will be more willing to work with you.
  • Since many workplaces are becoming virtual or more horizontal, this theory can teach you how to be effective in those environments.
  • Using collaborative behaviors can help you gain the trust of your peers and create a culture of respect.

How do I use it?

  • When working on a group project, engage in conversations and planning that allow everyone to share their ideas to create goals.
  • When creating your student organization and thinking of your mission, make sure to write down and display the values and mission you all create together.
  • When working on a project, make sure everyone understands what their role is and how they can contribute.

Resource Link

Kramer, M. W., & Crespy, D. A. (2011). Communicating collaborative leadership. The Leadership Quarterly22(5), 1024-1037. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.leaqua.2011.07.021

Emotionally Intelligent Leadership

Emotional Intelligence grid including social and self components of self-awareness, social-awareness, self management, and social skills.

What is this?

Emotional intelligence can help you think about how your leadership behaviors can formulate your future actions as a leader, the experiences of the people around you, and how you might change your actions depending on the situation you are in. By understanding how your behaviors are affected by your context, your self, and others, you can be more effective in your leadership.

How does it help me?

  • Understanding your context, self, and others helps you be more exact about the ways you would like to lead.
  • Understanding that leadership is based on our actions can help you move past needing to have a title or position to make an impact.
  • Using this theory can help you discover the different ways you can enact change.

How do I use it?

  • Engage in a reflective activity like StrengthsFinder of Myers-Briggs to better understand your primary behaviors in situations.
  • Not every situation in a project will be perfect and you might encounter frustration. Make sure that when working with others that everyone has an opportunity to share feedback.
  • When working with groups, make sure there are opportunities for people to get to know each other through social events and fun games.

Resource Link

Allen, S. J., Shankman, M. L., & Miguel, R. F. (2012). Emotionally intelligent leadership: An integrative, process-oriented theory of student leadership. Journal of Leadership Education11(1), 177–203. https://doi.org/10.12806/V11/I1/TF1

Relational Leadership

Process: Inclusive, Empowering, and Ethical interactions with Purpose in center.

What is this?

Using this model can help you increase the impact of your ideas by leveraging the power of groups to generate a vision of change together. You can learn to value building relationships that respect and trust group members in order to work effectively.

How does it help me?

  • This theory teaches you to respect differing perspectives from yours and seeing the value in those perspectives.
  • Like other theories in this toolkit, it also teaches you the value of building a shared vision with a group.
  • Given its focus on social responsibility, it centers on how to act ethically, and respect other people in groups and communities.

How do I use it?

  • Attend training or workshop that focuses on having difficult conversations with people or how to facilitate conversations.
  • When making decisions for your student organization, create ways to share information about decisions with all members.
  • Make sure that groups or projects you are a part of prioritize giving and receiving feedback.

Resource Link

Ferch, S. R., & Mitchell, M. M. (2001). Intentional forgiveness in relational leadership: A technique for enhancing effective leadership. Journal of Leadership Studies7(4), 70-83. https://doi.org/10.1177/107179190100700406

Servant Leadership

Winston, B.E. (2003), Extending Patterson’s servant leadership model: explaining how leaders and followers interact in a circular model.

What is this?

Instead of leading through a title or power, your peers might be inspired by your vision if they are willing to follow your vision because it serves a larger purpose. Servant leaders support and help the larger group instead of their personal goals to enact change.

How does it help me?

  • By thinking by others rather than yourself first, your ideas of change can grow and therefore be more impactful.
  • By acting as a servant leader, you can focus more on community based projects which can be more complex, interesting, and fulfilling.
  • Using servant leadership can have you focus more on training and developing other people.

How do I use it?

  • Consider becoming a peer mentor for a course or a student program so you can become a key part of your peer’s development.
  • In order to make community-based change, it is important to understand community needs. Emphasize practicing your active listening skills to learn about others’ needs.
  • Consider taking tutoring or teaching based courses and trainings to learn about how to grow other people.

Resource Link

Parris, D. L., & Peachey, J. W. (2013). A systematic literature review of servant leadership theory in organizational contexts. Journal of Business Ethics113(3), 377-393. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10551-012-1322-6

Situational Leadership

Situational leadership model by Hersey and Blanchard. Graph of supportive behavior and directive behavior interaction. A bell curve is displayed on top of 4 quadrants that read delegating, supporting, coaching, and directing.

What is this?

When serving in a leadership position, you might notice that your peers all complete tasks and projects differently. By using this model, you can provide the right kind of support for your peers by enacting different styles of leadership.

How does it help me?

  • Using this model can help you determine what kind of guidance to provide for other people.
  • Since people can become more adept at finishing tasks, this model can help you determine when your peers are ready to work more independently.
  • This is an easy model to interpret to quickly detemine what kind of leadership style to enact.

How do I use it?

  • Conduct a leadership style assessment like StrengthsFinder or Myers-Brigg with your student organization to learn about how people like to be led.
  • When in a new position of leadership, have conversations with your peers about their preferred working style.
  • Think about what goals you are trying to accomplish in a project in order to determine how to lead.

Resource Link

Graeff, C. L. (1997). Evolution of situational leadership theory: A critical review. The Leadership Quarterly8(2), 153-170. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1048-9843(97)90014-X

Social Change Model of Leadership

Social change model: group values, individual values, and societal values interact to promote change.

What is this?

By focusing on making change, you can transform your leadership style by leading through values that you share with other people. By leading with community-created values, you can ensure everyone involved is committed to your shared idea of change.

How does it help me?

  • Like the Emotionally Intelligent Leadership model, this allows you to see how values are shared and created within yourself, within a group, and for the larger community.
  • This model combines other forms of leadership that are collaborative which helps you learn how to effectively work with others.
  • Its focus on change can help you think about your ultimate goal which can build motivation to engage in a service project.

How do I use it?

  • When designing the mission of your student organization, think about how the idea of change could be achieved through the efforts of your group.
  • Integrate opportunities for community service or volunteering through your organization.
  • Engage in volunteer events or community based internships to learn more about how change is implemented.

Resource Link

Wagner, W. (1996). The social change model of leadership: A brief overview. Leadership11, 8-10.

Systems Theory

The Systems Model: Top Management. President is at the top of the tree working down to master planning council which is connected to resource committee and operations committee. Each is connected to its own systems.

What is this?

When joining a group or project, it can be difficult to make sense of how decisions are made, what roles people serve, and how to get things done. By using Systems Theory, you can begin to understand how organizations and groups work and come up with ideas on how to design your own groups.

How does it help me?

  • Thinking of a group or organization as a system can help you understand responsibilites that are associated with a role.
  • This theory can help you design a structure for your student organizations and projects to ensure ideas are completed effectively.
  • By understanding the structure of a group or organization, you can better understand how to enact an idea or ask questions based on the power attributed to a position.

How do I use it?

  • When beginning a project or creating a new organization, think about your goals and how the work to accomplish those goals can be distributed.
  • When creating an organization, it can be helpful to design an organizational chart so everyone understands their roles and responsibilities.
  • Try creating position descriptions for your organization and clearly delineate their tasks and responsibilities.

Resource Link

Schneider, M., & Somers, M. (2006). Organizations as complex adaptive systems: Implications of complexity theory for leadership research. The Leadership Quarterly17(4), 351-365.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.leaqua.2006.04.006

Transformational Leadership

Transformational leadership = idealized influence + inspirational motivation + intellectual stimulation + individualized consideration.

What is this?

By using this theory, you can tap into behaviors that can help inspire other people to follow your idea of change. This theory focuses on behaviors like charisma and care for others to convince groups of people to work with you.

How does it help me?

  • Using this form of leadership instead of transactional leadership will make it more likely for others to follow your vision for change since you are using influence instead of fear or power to lead.
  • Part of inspiring others means creating a vision with other people, so this theory can help you think about how to create goals with groups of people.
  • Like servant leadership, the focus is on others rather than yourself which can help you build stronger relationships with your peers.

How do I use it?

  • Practice your leadership behaviors related to influence like building relationships with people, acting confidently, and using charisma to appeal to people’s interests.
  • Focus your time on getting to know your peers and their values.
  • Within your organizations, ask members what they are excited about or how they would like to innovate to see if that can be added to or modify the goals of your organization.

Resource Link

Bass, B. M. (1999). Two decades of research and development in transformational leadership. European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology8(1), 9-32.

Tuckman's Stages of Group Development

Tuckman's 5 Stages of Team Development: forming, storming, norming, performing, adjourning along team effectiveness and performance impact axes.

What is this?

When entering a new team through a project or student organization, you may have noticed that your first couple of meetings together feel a bit awkward. This model can help you understand why communication might be happening a certain way and how you can help your team become stronger.

How does it help me?

  • Having a way to identity why your team might be behaving a certain way can help you modify how you complete work together to ensure everyone feels included and happy.
  • This model provides methods to ensure your team keeps working with consistent energy and feel supported.
  • The model’s focus on feelings of team members allows you to quickly assess by looking at physical features like facial experessions.

How do I use it?

  • When starting on a new team, having an orientation process can be useful so people understand expectations and goals.
  • Make sure people have opportunities to share feedback and receive feedback.
  • Establish team groundrules and agreements so people feel more willing to contribute ideas and engage in discussion.

Resource Link

Tuckman, B. W., & Jensen, M. A. C. (1977). Stages of small-group development revisited. Group & Organization Studies2(4), 419–427. https://doi.org/10.1177/105960117700200404

Using Leadership Theory - Faculty & Staff

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Authentic Leadership

Elements of positive psychological capacities and positive organizational context lead to positive self-development and trigger events/challenges, finally resulting in authentic leadership.
An Authentic Leadership Development Model (Luthans & Avolio, 2003, p. 251)

What is this?

This theory describes how individuals can benefit from utilizing positive psychological behaviors within organizational contexts. As a result, people experience both greater self-awareness and self-regulated positive behaviors, fostering positive self-development and stronger relationships with other people.

How does it help me?

  • You can engage in self-reflection to help others in groups and teams see your true intentions while leading.
  • You can help teams and groups openly agree on shared values and build relationships with each other.
  • You can help students discover their own values and beliefs in order to genuinely lead.

How do I use it?

  • Through self-reflection, discover which positive behaviors listed in this model that you can foster in order to build rapport with other people.
  • Use this model to discover shared values with people in groups and teams in order to build more cohesion for a project or committee.
  • The values in this model can help you think about how to build genuine relationships with other students through programming and advising.

Resource Link

Avolio, B. J., & Gardner, W. L. (2005). Authentic leadership development: Getting to the root of positive forms of leadership. The Leadership Quarterly16(3), 315-338. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.leaqua.2005.03.001 

Collaborative Leadership

Fig 1. Creating a collaborative structure.

What is this?

This theory describes processes to engage all members in a group or team and valuing their collective skills and knowledge in order to solve problems. By using this theory, individuals can learn to rely on influence rather than positional authority to build relationships with others.

How does it help?

  • By discouraging the use of authority when leading, you can multiply the number of positive behaviors you can utilize when working with others.
  • When working in groups or teams, engaging everyone in problem-solving and decision-making can create stronger solutions.
  • When working with students, using this theory can ensure tasks and projects are interesting, challenging, and exciting.

How do I use it?

  • Through self-reflection, think of which behaviors and habits might affect your willingness to learn and step out of your comfort zone.
  • When working in groups and teams, ensure there are set processes for giving and receiving feedback.
  • When creating projects with your students, ensure they understand your vision by including them in the creation of the project and needed steps for completion.

Resource Link

Kramer, M. W., & Crespy, D. A. (2011). Communicating collaborative leadership. The Leadership Quarterly22(5), 1024-1037. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.leaqua.2011.07.021

Emotionally Intelligent Leadership

Emotional Intelligence grid including social and self components of self-awareness, social-awareness, self management, and social skills.

What is this?

With an intentional focus on context, self and others, emotionally intelligent leaders facilitate the attainment of desired outcomes. The 21 capacities equip individuals with the knowledge, skills, abilities, and other characteristics to achieve desired results.

How does it help?

  • Given the 21 capacities for building leadership behaviors, this theory provides specific ways to teach and build leadership behaviors.
  • When working within groups or teams, being aware of one’s emotions allows us to work more effectively by deciding whether we should rely on default behaviors or a different approach.
  • Since this theory was designed specifically for student leaders, this model provides a rich set of topics to design workshops and training.

How do I use it?

  • Design a semester-long leadership workshop series or course based on the 21 capacities for leadership.
  • When providing feedback or conducting performance reviews, the 21 capacities provide key learning outcomes to ensure who you are working it is growing in their leadership development.

Resource Link

Allen, S. J., Shankman, M. L., & Miguel, R. F. (2012). Emotionally intelligent leadership: An integrative, process-oriented theory of student leadership. Journal of Leadership Education11(1), 177–203. https://doi.org/10.12806/V11/I1/TF1

Relational Leadership

Process: Inclusive, Empowering, and Ethical interactions with Purpose in center.

What is this?

A relational and ethical process of people together attempting to accomplish change or make a difference to benefit the common good. In order to enact change effectively, relationships between people are key.

How does it help?

  • Its focus on morality and social responsibility give this theory versatility to integrate your (and others) value and belief systems when leading and working with other people.
  • The framework of knowing, being, and doing, specify key leadership behaviors which be useful for designing leadership courses and training.
  • The focus on process provides suggestions on how to build a collaborative process for working with other people and groups.

How do I use it?

  • Use the knowing, being, and doing framework to design key learning outcomes for potential leadership development training and workshops.
  • When working with students, you can demonstrate the value of building relationships by demonstrating how the five components of leadership are effective ways to lead.
  • You can integrate spiritual and values-based ways of thinking when solving issues to ensure everyone feels included and to increase the number of solutions to an issue.

Resource Link

Ferch, S. R., & Mitchell, M. M. (2001). Intentional forgiveness in relational leadership: A technique for enhancing effective leadership. Journal of Leadership Studies7(4), 70-83. https://doi.org/10.1177/107179190100700406

Servant Leadership

Winston, B.E. (2003), Extending Patterson’s servant leadership model: explaining how leaders and followers interact in a circular model.

What is this?

Servant leadership is a leadership philosophy in which the main goal of the leader is to serve. A servant leader shares power, puts the needs of people first and helps people develop and perform as highly as possible.

How does it help?

  • Prioritize the wellbeing of people in an organization over organization performance which can help them buy-in to a larger vision for change.
  • Servant leaders become powerful change agents because they priortizing learning about groups and communities in order to advocate for their needs.
  • Its focus on others allows you to practice advising and teaching skills which can create a better experience for your students.

How do I use it?

  • Practice leadership behaviors like active listening and empathy in order to truly understand the needs of the people around you.
  • To build an inclusive environment for your students, using this theory can help you priortize wellness to better support the students you serve.
  • Attend professional development trainings that focus on concepts of serving in advising and teaching.

Resource Link

Parris, D. L., & Peachey, J. W. (2013). A systematic literature review of servant leadership theory in organizational contexts. Journal of Business Ethics113(3), 377-393. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10551-012-1322-6

Situational Leadership

Situational leadership model by Hersey and Blanchard. Graph of supportive behavior and directive behavior interaction. A bell curve is displayed on top of 4 quadrants that read delegating, supporting, coaching, and directing.

What is this?

There is no single “best” style of leadership. Effective leadership is task-relevant, and the most successful leaders are those who adapt their leadership style to the performance readiness (ability and willingness) of the individual or group they are attempting to lead or influence.

How does it help?

  • Focus on providing direction and support rather than willingness to complete tasks.
  • Belief in mastery and competence, which dictates needed leadership styles.
  • Maximize goal and task completion through a easy to read model that quickly allows you to select a leadership style.

How do I use it?

  • When beginning a project, use this model to help define roles for who should complete tasks based on the complexitiy of the work.
  • When working with a group or managing a team, use this model to determine how often you need to conduct 1:1 meetings or opportunities for feedback.
  • Use this model to lead in specific contexts since it helps define specific leadership styles and its associated behaviors, which is useful in determining types of support for your students.

Resource Link

Graeff, C. L. (1997). Evolution of situational leadership theory: A critical review. The Leadership Quarterly8(2), 153-170. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1048-9843(97)90014-X

Social Change Model of Leadership

Social change model: group values, individual values, and societal values interact to promote change.

What is this?

It describes leadership as a purposeful, collaborative, values-driven process, instead of a title or position. Leaders try to improve the groups or communities they are part of. In this approach to leadership, a “leader” is anyone who wants to work with others to make a difference.

How does it help?

  • The focus on change helps creating a deeper sense of purpose for groups which can build buy-in for your idea or organization.
  • This 8 Cs of leadership provide a comprehensive set of topics to design a series of leadership trainings and workshops.
  • Its focus on collaboration within all level of change (i.e. self, group, and community) creates a constant feedback loop which increase the impact of your idea of change.

How do I use it?

  • Use the 8 Cs in the model to design a series of workshops and training where each C can serve as learning outcomes.
  • Try integrating service learning components in your class, program, or work experiences for group members.
  • Try creating experiential learning experiences to learn the concepts in this model so participants can visualize what change could look like for themselves.

Resource Link

Wagner, W. (1996). The social change model of leadership: A brief overview. Leadership11, 8-10.

Systems Theory

The Systems Model: Top Management. President is at the top of the tree working down to master planning council which is connected to resource committee and operations committee. Each is connected to its own systems.

What is this?

An objective, understandable environment for decision making. By providing decision makers and stakeholders an explicit framework, leadership behaviors can be easier and more effective to enact.

How does it help?

  • This theory can help breakdown organizaitonal processes by helping you understand how decision making and communitcaiton channels are built which can help with continuous improvement.
  • When working with others on a project or committee, utilziing this theory can help you quickly create structure for others to follow and cause less confusion.
  • Many students you work with might not have experience with organizational management and this theory can help you explain the benefits of enacting those management principles.

How do I use it?

  • Design a training using this theory for upcoming managers or student leaders to help teach them principles related to organizational management.
  • If you notice tasks are not being completed or at the pace you expect, using this theory can help you determine if your group or organizaitonal structure might be the cause of those issues.
  • When preparing to propose an idea for a project, using this theory can help you identify your spheres of influence and which stakeholders to involve to increase the likelihood your idea is adopted.

Resource Link

Schneider, M., & Somers, M. (2006). Organizations as complex adaptive systems: Implications of complexity theory for leadership research. The Leadership Quarterly17(4), 351-365.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.leaqua.2006.04.006

Transformational Leadership

Transformational leadership = idealized influence + inspirational motivation + intellectual stimulation + individualized consideration.

What is this?

Encompasses the act of empowering individuals to fulfill their contractual obligations, meet the needs of the organization, and go beyond the “call of duty” for the betterment of the institution (Santamaría & Nevarez, 2010).

How does it help?

  • Involve followers in idea creating and problem solving.
  • Encourage two way communication between leaders and followers.
  • The model identifies additional behaviors related to influence that you can help other people and students practice.

How do I use it?

  • Using the four factors of transformational leadership to lead a small series of workshops to teach other people on how to develop leadership behaviors related to influence.
  • When beginning a project or committee, engage in brainstorming with members to come up with aspirational goals to encourgage excitement about this new venture.
  • Practice your public speaking and presentation skills by receiving feedback from others about how inspired they felt by your presentation.

Resource Link

Bass, B. M. (1999). Two decades of research and development in transformational leadership. European Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology8(1), 9-32.

Tuckman's Stages of Group Development

Tuckman's 5 Stages of Team Development: forming, storming, norming, performing, adjourning along team effectiveness and performance impact axes.

What is this?

The forming–storming–norming–performing model of group development was first proposed by Bruce Tuckman in 1965, who said that these phases are all necessary and inevitable in order for the team to grow, face up to challenges, tackle problems, find solutions, plan work, and deliver results.

How does it help?

  • This theory helps you understand that group development is parallel with individual development, which increases the number of ways you can support someone.
  • Understanding group structure and task performance changes over time normalize the feelings of unease or frustrtation group members could feel.
  • The theory can be directly applied to student orientation groups, peer mentoring teams, and other student based teams to help support their development.

How do I use it?

  • When working with students, it is important to help set expectations and an inclusive environment through orientations, icebreakers, and plenty of face to face time.
  • When working with groups and teams, it is vital to acknowledge conflict is normal and to engage in conflict resoultion with others.
  • Help build autonomy for people by providing constant feedback and encouraging others to collaborate with each other.

Resource Link

Tuckman, B. W., & Jensen, M. A. C. (1977). Stages of small-group development revisited. Group & Organization Studies2(4), 419–427. https://doi.org/10.1177/105960117700200404

 

Student Programs

alps

Adventure Learning Programs

ALPs is a student organization that provides workshops to improve group dynamics and build community on campus. ALPs uses the UW-Madison Leadership Framework for 40 student facilitators to reflect on their leadership skills and to track their leadership growth over their tenure with the program. The framework gives facilitators terminology for writing resumes and interviewing.

ALPS Learning Outcomes Worksheet Example

Badger volunteers engaging in a sustainability project clearing an area

Badger Volunteers

Badger Volunteers is a semester-long program that pairs teams of students with community organizations, volunteering 1-4 hours each week at the same organization. Centered around the leadership framework, students foster meaningful and consistent connections with community partners over the semester. Badger Volunteers provides logistical support, transportation, training and education sessions for student volunteers in the program.

BV Leader Values Example
BV Interview Screening Form Example
BV Leadership Competencies Activity Example

DonStudents
Leadership Certificate

The Leadership Certificate program reinforces the University of Wisconsin-Madison’s commitment to developing student leadership capacity through intentional reflection and engagement in learning both inside and outside the classroom, for the purpose of meaningful change. The Certificate marks a formal acknowledgement of student contributions and achievements.

Student athletes gathered around a table in discussion.

Student-Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC)

The Office of Student-Athlete Development is committed to inspiring, engaging, and advancing student-athletes outside of the athletic arena by providing programming and resources through four key pillars: Leadership & Involvement, Personal Development, Career Development, and Diversity & Inclusion. SAAC focuses on one of the 7 leadership competencies at each monthly meeting for its 50+ student members.

Wisconsin engineering student council group photo.

Wisconsin Engineering Student Council

This program integrates the UW-Madison Leadership Framework by providing engineering students the opportunity to take on leadership roles within the College of Engineering. The Council provides 2 or 3 leadership development focused sessions throughout each semester, and provides a mentor program to new engineering students to help them excel in future leadership roles.

Goofy group photo at the All-Campus Leadership Conference

All Campus Leadership Conference

Presented by the Student Leadership Program, this is the largest fully student-run event at UW-Madison, with an audience of approximately 900 individuals. This event is held annually in February, with 25 breakout sessions meeting one or more values or competencies of the UW-Madison Leadership Framework. The framework helps students focus on learning more about their leadership needs and interests.

2019 Bucky Award Winner in Global Citizenship Award: Shiloah Coley

Bucky’s Award Ceremony

This event spotlights excellence in individual and organizational leadership. The UW-Madison Leadership Framework serves as the rubric for the Outstanding Leadership Award. The Awards program recognizes 10 student organizations and 6 student leaders.

(Photo by Jeff Miller / UW-Madison)

Queer Emerging Leaders Program 

QUELP uses the framework’s Outcomes to structure a 13-week course focused on power, privilege, personal narrative, and community organizing. Participants support their own communities by working with organizational partners who serve LBGTQ+ people and needs.


Willis L. Jones Leadership Center

The Willis L. Jones Leadership Center is a part of the Wisconsin Union. The goal of the JLC is to inspire and prepare students to work in partnership with others to positively transform themselves, their peers and their communities.

Wisconsin experience bus trip group photo at football stadium.

Wisconsin Experience Bus Trip

29 student leaders visit 10 cities over 5 days. Daily reflection questions are grounded in the UW-Madison Leadership Framework. Students showed immeasurable growth in a sense of integrity, engagement and connection to community.

Faculty & Staff Examples

Badgers Step Up logo

Badgers Step Up!

The Badgers Step Up! training program engages student organization participants as agents of change to address alcohol abuse. This program is an example of incorporating the framework to develop effective intervention techniques and explore the use of specific leadership competencies to reduce harm.

Students engaging in discussion at the Multicultural Student Center.
(Photo by Bryce Richter /UW-Madison)

Leadership and Civic Engagement for Social Change

Leadership development can also take form as a course. For example, this course engaged first year students looking into exploring who they are, how identity impacts leadership, and how to create change in their communities. Students had the opportunity to translate their leadership development into action through the lens of civic engagement and social justice.
Please contact us for more information on creating a leadership development course at leadership@wisc.edu.

Image of UW-Madison Arboretum Earth Partnership Restoration Team on site at a project.

UW-Madison Arboretum Earth Partnership Restoration

Restoration team leaders are an essential corps of land care volunteers at the Arboretum. They participate in ecological restoration by leading other volunteers from diverse backgrounds. Team leaders teach and supervise volunteers, practicing leadership and communications skills aligned with the UW-Madison Leadership Framework.

AHEC group photo.

Wisconsin Area Health Education Center (AHEC)

Wisconsin AHEC’s statewide Community Health Internship Program is for students participating in community health internships in 49 sites throughout the state. In 2015, 25 mentors were trained in using the Leadership@UW Leadership Competency Assessment to guide 50 interns in leadership development over the 8 week summer program.

Community of Practice meeting around a table.

Digital Publishing and Printing Service

Employees of DoIT’s Digital Publishing and Printing Services office leans on the framework’s Values and Competencies to develop stretch and growth goals for themselves with management guidance. These intentional conversations have resulted in increased employee connections and commitment to their work.

University employees meeting and discussion.
(Photo by Jeff Miller / UW-Madison)

Summit Executive Centre

The framework can also be used for workshop facilitation like through the Summit Executive Centre. Owner and UW-Madison Alumnus, Louise Silberman, offered two customized, day long events for managers and employees. The UW-Madison Leadership Framework was used as a foundation for success. The workshops encouraged open dialogue as a way for all employees to understand each person’s contribution to success. Please contact us for more information at leadership@wisc.edu.

Pharmacy consultation in the school of pharmacy.

UW-Madison School of Pharmacy

The School of Pharmacy integrates the UW–Madison Leadership Framework into its operations to create dynamic leadership outcomes for its students. The program emphasizes leadership development for clinical pharmacists as an action-oriented endeavor not based on formal authority positions, and will be used to make student pharmacists responsive to the context of each patient-system interaction.

Faculty & Staff Programs

Professional development at the University of Wisconsin - Madison logo.

Fully Prepared to Lead

Fully Prepared to Lead is a competency-based professional development program integrated with the UW-Madison Leadership Framework. The certificate program and courses are for UW-Madison employees looking to develop their leadership skills. By attending these courses, you will feel empowered to positively influence your work environment and recognize the personal leadership that you bring to your team.

Fully Prepared to Lead Flyer
Student studying in the memorial library stacks.
(Photo by Jeff Miller / UW-Madison)

University of Wisconsin Libraries

The mission of the UW-Madison Libraries is to support excellence in teaching, research and learning by providing resources, services and spaces that help to ensure the success of our students, faculty, and staff. Through meeting and dialoguing as small groups, we form deep trust where difficult questions can be asked, honest conversations are held, and personal and professional growth takes place.

Reading Spreadsheet Example
Goal Tracking Spreadsheet Example 
Leadership@UW Framework Example 

Servant leadership certificate 2019 spring group photo.

Servant Leadership Certificate

This Continuing Studies program consists of the fundamentals of servant leadership, a self-assessment, community building, stewardship, and final presentation by participants on a reflective project of their choice. The program is targeted to aspiring leaders/managers in all organizational sectors.